The 20th Conference of the IWGP in 2025 will take place in Groningen

The International Work Group for Palaeoethnobotany welcomes you !

 

“Palaeoethnobotany (ca. synonym: archaeobotany) is the part of environmental archaeology which concerns the study of plant remains (mainly macroremains like seeds and wood, but also microremains like pollen) preserved on, or in association with, archaeological sites.

 

Archaeobotany is mainly concerned with the activities carried out by past populations, of which by far the most important one is subsistence. This means: what food people ate, how they obtained it, and how and where they stored and processed it once it had been collected. Archaeobotanists, however, also look at trade, construction materials and aspects of rituals. In addition, archaeobotany also provides information about past environments, especially anthropogenic ones like fields or grassland.”

Stefanie Jacomet (2006)

 

For a detailed overview of our research topic, you may want to see the
Wikipedia page on palaeoethnobotany

 

Who are we?

 

The IWGP is the informal and decentral collective of all researchers working in the wide field of archaeobotany…

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The Organisation

 

The IWGP is a voluntary group and has no registered members and no president…

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The Conferences

 

The first Conference took place in 1968. Since then, our conferences have been held in a regular triennial cycle without interruption…

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The IWGP Committee

 

It is the IWGP’s only continuous institution, aiming for the further development of archaeobotany…

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The Journal

 

Established in 1992, Vegetation History and Archaeobotany is the official publishing organ of the IWGP

Twitter Feed

Wild grass peas expressing explosive dehiscence. https://twitter.com/i/web/status/1595797982733123584

Are you interested in exploring the changes that happen to plants under domestication? A fascinating article by @maddlesthegreat and myself discussing changing dehiscence. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/9781119312994.apr0795?utm_sq=grq7sdtfar

"What Lisa achieved is phenomenal. Her curiosity, generosity and selflessness, combined with her extraordinary efficiency and practicality, means that her legacy will endure for many more years."

https://www.arch.ox.ac.uk/article/lisa-lodwick-1988-2022

#IWGP2022 the organizing committee gathering to reminisce and look back on the great conference that they hosted. #archaeobotany #paleoethnobotany #archaeology

It is with heavy hearts that we share the news that our dear friend, Dr Lisa Lodwick, passed away yesterday. She has left a legacy of innovative, collaborative work that stretches far beyond Oxford. Our deepest sympathies to her family and husband Jo. She will be sorely missed.

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Background image: Charred cultivated plant remains from Fuente Álamo (prov. Almería, Spain), Bronze Age El Argar culture © Hans-Peter Stika